Documents

The Vademecum is a guidance for museums and cultural heritage institutions to technology solutions for their collections. It explains the benefits, but also the pitfalls, of technology, and gives a concise overview of currently existing technology solutions improve the access to and the experience of cultural heritage. It gives use case scenarios and provides links to best practice cases. In the Annex, users find a list of eCult Ambassadors and their expertise, that can help them to plan an effective technology strategy.

This document points out the needs for new technology solutions in cultural heritage institutions and how the future of museums can be shaped by ICT. It gives recommendations, also for public bodies and decision makers, on how to support the up-take of ICT by cultural heritage institutions.

This document is the result of interviews, eCult Dialogue Days where museums discussed with technology providers, and a Stakeholder event where representatives from museums, technology, academia and intermediaries looked forward to the future of museums.

To promote the eCult Observatory and its activities, we created a postcard that can be easily printed.

This document takes stock of the status quo by presenting the existing technological offer and the status of deployment. 

Chapter 1 presents the aims and objectives of the report, while chapter 2 offers the necessary background information about the methodology. In the next two chapters, we introduce, in alphabetical order, the available communication technologies for cultural heritage institutions which are outcomes of EC-funded projects and national initiatives, respectively. Finally, Chapter 5 includes the conclusions drawn on the basis of the presented data.

The main aim of eCultValue is to encourage the use of new technologies that have the potential to revolutionise the way we are dealing with and accessing Cultural Heritage (CH) in Europe. For doing this, it is important to capture the point of view and the needs of the stakeholders working in Cultural Heritage institutions, in relation to the use of ICT. The eCultValue partners have, therefore, performed a number of interviews with CH stakeholders and technology providers from several European countries. This deliverable reports the findings of this activity. It presents the information obtained as a result of the interviews, in the form of quantitative data, but it also highlights what has derived and qualitatively concluded during these meetings.

The main aim of the eCultValue project is to encourage the use of new technologies that have the potential to revolutionise the way we are dealing with and accessing Cultural Heritage (CH) in Europe. For doing this, it is important to capture the points of view and the needs of the stakeholders working in Cultural Heritage institutions, in relation to the use of ICT. In the context of the “Interview Summary Report”, the eCultValue partners have, therefore, performed a number of interviews with CH stakeholders and technology providers from several European countries. Some of the main outcomes of this activity are presented in this report.

This questionnaire has been used by the eCultValue partners in Europe to better understand the use of new technologies in museums. Results will be compiled and communicated on the eCult Observatory. If you are involved in Culture Heritage, please fill in this questionnaire and send it to us by e-mail at info [at] ecultobservatory . eu

This paper from the ArtSense project examines the potential of Augmented Reality for the museum and gallery visiting experience.

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http://bit.ly/13Gd5zV

Storytelling is a new way to guide museum visitors, where the traditional set of exhibit-centric descriptions is replaced by storycentric cohesive narrations with carefully-designed references to the exhibits. Personalized storytelling customizes the narrations according to different user characteristics, either statically or dynamically during the visit. In this paper, we describe the basic elements of an effort towards achieving personalized storytelling for museum visits in the context of the CHESS project. We outline the user and story models employed, we detail the main tools and mechanisms to bootstrap personalization for first-time visitors, and we describe the overall system architecture. The results of some very preliminary experiments with actual visitors are encouraging and show several directions for future work.